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U.P. will feel effects of Sandy

October 29, 2012
The Daily News

By NIKKI YOUNK

& the Associated Press

IRON MOUNTAIN - Low pressure from Hurricane Sandy will affect weather in the Upper Peninsula starting tonight, but no severe conditions are expected.

Jane Marie Wix of the National Weather Service (NWS) in Marquette said that the eastern Upper Peninsula should see some snow and rain tonight.

She added that by mid-day Tuesday, Dickinson County and eastern Iron County will experience sustained winds between 18 to 21 miles per hour and gusts of up to 32 miles per hour. The winds will die down overnight.

"Then there's a slight chance of drizzle or snow Tuesday night, but more in Dickinson than Iron," said Wix. "There shouldn't be any accumulation."

Severe weather bearing down on the Eastern Seaboard could lead to waves as high as 33 feet on parts of Lake Michigan and dangerous conditions on other Great Lakes.

The National Weather Service has issued Great Lakes gale and storm warnings in effect through Wednesday. It says waves on Lake Michigan could be 10 to 18 feet by Monday afternoon, then build to 20 to 33 feet on Tuesday before subsiding. Waves on parts of Lake Superior and Lake Huron could top 20 feet.

Dangerous conditions are expected along piers and breakwalls in areas including southwestern Michigan. Snow linked to the storm could fall in parts of Michigan.

Hurricane Sandy strengthened early Monday, putting it on a collision course with two other weather systems that would create a superstorm.

Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

Sandy strengthened before dawn and stayed on a predicted path toward Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York - putting it on a collision course with two other weather systems that would create a superstorm with the potential for havoc over 800 miles from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. About 2 to 3 feet of snow were even forecast for mountainous parts of West Virginia.

The tempest could endanger up to 50 million people for days.

"This is the worst-case scenario," said Louis Uccellini, environmental prediction chief for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Many workers planned to stay home Monday as subways, buses and trains shut down across the region under the threat of flooding that could inundate tracks and tunnels. Airports also closed, with thousands of flights canceled, and authorities warned that the time for evacuation was running out or already past. Utilities brought in extra crews, anticipating widespread power failures.

The center of the storm was positioned to come ashore Monday night in New Jersey, meaning the worst of the surge could be in the northern part of that state and in New York City and on Long Island. Higher tides brought by a full moon compounded the threat to the metropolitan area of about 20 million people.

Canals around Long Island's Great South Bay area were bulging two hours before high tide. Water was about a foot deep on some streets in Lindenhurst, N.Y., by 7 a.m. Monday.

As rain from the leading edges began to fall over the Northeast on Sunday, hundreds of thousands of people from Maryland to Connecticut were ordered to leave low-lying coastal areas, including 375,000 in lower Manhattan and other parts of New York City, 50,000 in Delaware and 30,000 in Atlantic City, N.J., where the city's 12 casinos shut down for only the fourth time ever.

 
 

 

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